ON THE RISE

Amanda Blush

Pop
RECORDING ARTIST : AMANDA BLUSH | RECORDING LABEL : BLUSH MUSIC INC. | PHOTOGRAPHER & VIDEOGRAPHER : BROCK NEWMAN | MAKE UP ARTIST : MICAH GILBERT |

Juggling a full time career as a professional recording artist, songwriter and actor Amanda constantly leaps into artistic endeavors with fervor. Between writing and recording songs for her third album, auditioning for various film and TV shows, and modeling for many notable photographers in Vancouver, Miss Blush continues to pursue as many artistic outlets as she possibly can.

Having started in the music industry at the age of ten, Amanda Blush has worked with some big talents including Grammy Award winning Producer, Ian Prince in London, England. The two collaborated on her first two albums, also bringing aboard Socan Award winning Producer, Ovidiu Bistriceanu,whose partnership has resulted in numerous radio charting singles released in Canada over the last four years.

With a single due to be released in the upcoming months, Blush currently spends her free time developing an EP with her writing partner and guitarist Reid Campbell. The two have become an indie folk duo with a sound resembling that of Fleetwood Mac, The Civil Wars, and John Mayer. When talking about this musical shift she notes: “Exploring new avenues in my craft has always been the goal and is equally as exciting. I strive to push and challenge myself to go further, delve deeper and farther outside my comfort zone. Comfort is the enemy. Freedom comes from having complete fear of the unknown but jumping into it anyway. This is a broad change for me musically and creatively, I’m really enjoying what I’m finding in this way of working and couldn’t be happier with the content Reid and I have beautifully and arduously composed”.

When she isn’t busy in the studio, she’s busy at home conceptualizing visuals for her next photoshoot collaboration or studying for a role; she’s a woman with many hats and a force to be reckoned with. We had a chance to sit down and interview Amanda.

amanda blush photo

AB10

JB What is your earliest musical memory?

AB I have a fond memory of my parents and I driving through the hilled and winding roads of New Zealand. Me, in the backseat, in my birthday suit singing along to a Fijian tape (yes I’m old enough that we had actual tapes back then). What a strange story it must seem for those who don’t know, but I grew up part of my life in Fiji and used to be able to speak quite fluently so the fact that we were listening to Fijian songs wasn’t out of the ordinary for me. We’d drive for hours sometimes and then when the tape had finished, we’d flip it over to the other side and keep going. How my parents didn’t get sick of my singing I’ll never know.

JB What did you feel was the biggest obstacle you had to overcome when you decided to pursue a career in music? How did you handle it?

AB To be honest I can’t think of one because there wasn’t really ever a time that I’d made a “decision” on the matter. It was sort of always understood by me and everyone around me that this is where I was headed. A life in music was always going to be my path. I don’t even recall having a conversation with my parents about it. “Well folks, I’m gonna be a singer and have my name on a star one day”… no, I think I got lucky to have such a supportive family.

JB How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

AB Garbage. No, I’m joking. Anyone who’s the least bit creative knows how hard it is to really be happy with something you’ve made. Or maybe I should speak for myself; I’m a perfectionist so I’m never completely satisfied with my work. With two albums under my belt and a bunch of singles released with the help of some incredibly talented people, I’m still looking on to my next project. What can I make now, what do I have to say, what stories do I want to tell. My writing process is considerably cathartic. I suppose all my music reflects a time in my life, something I’ve gone through. I generally need to write something that is personal to me as I think anything else would seem less authentic.

JB What was the first tape/CD you bought?

AB Michael Jackson’s Thriller. (I’m not kidding, I cried for two weeks straight when I heard about his passing and still shed a tear listening to ballads of his from time to time. Michael will always be my first love).

JB If you had to go on a road trip across the country and you could only take one album with you, what would it be?

AB Paul Simon’s Graceland. (I’ve listened to this album back to back to back to back and never get bored)

JB What is your earliest musical memory?

AB I have a fond memory of my parents and I driving through the hilled and winding roads of New Zealand. Me, in the backseat, in my birthday suit singing along to a Fijian tape (yes I’m old enough that we had actual tapes back then). What a strange story it must seem for those who don’t know, but I grew up part of my life in Fiji and used to be able to speak quite fluently so the fact that we were listening to Fijian songs wasn’t out of the ordinary for me. We’d drive for hours sometimes and then when the tape had finished, we’d flip it over to the other side and keep going. How my parents didn’t get sick of my singing I’ll never know.

JB What did you feel was the biggest obstacle you had to overcome when you decided to pursue a career in music? How did you handle it?

AB To be honest I can’t think of one because there wasn’t really ever a time that I’d made a “decision” on the matter. It was sort of always understood by me and everyone around me that this is where I was headed. A life in music was always going to be my path. I don’t even recall having a conversation with my parents about it. “Well folks, I’m gonna be a singer and have my name on a star one day”… no, I think I got lucky to have such a supportive family.

JB How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

AB Garbage. No, I’m joking. Anyone who’s the least bit creative knows how hard it is to really be happy with something you’ve made. Or maybe I should speak for myself; I’m a perfectionist so I’m never completely satisfied with my work. With two albums under my belt and a bunch of singles released with the help of some incredibly talented people, I’m still looking on to my next project. What can I make now, what do I have to say, what stories do I want to tell. My writing process is considerably cathartic. I suppose all my music reflects a time in my life, something I’ve gone through. I generally need to write something that is personal to me as I think anything else would seem less authentic.

JB What was the first tape/CD you bought?

AB Michael Jackson’s Thriller. (I’m not kidding, I cried for two weeks straight when I heard about his passing and still shed a tear listening to ballads of his from time to time. Michael will always be my first love).

JB If you had to go on a road trip across the country and you could only take one album with you, what would it be?

AB Paul Simon’s Graceland. (I’ve listened to this album back to back to back to back and never get bored)

JB What artist/producers would you like to work with?

AB There are so many talents in the world that it’s incredibly difficult to choose. Some producers I’d very much like to work with include Max Martin, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, David Foster, Pharrell Williams, and Mutt Lange. Artist include Paul Simon, Prince, John Mayer, Coldplay, Ed Sheeran, and Peter Gabriel.

JB What are you currently listening to in your car or headphones?

AB Amy Winehouse – “Love is a Losing Game”

JB What kind of themes interest you as a musician?

AB Themes…if by theme you mean genres, then everything. I have very eclectic tastes ranging from grassroots country to opera/classical to straight up gangster rap. I generally have no restrictions when it comes to my selection of music. I have a deep affection for anything 80’s, Michael, Prince, Madonna, Boy George, all of it. It’s a strong influence in my own writing style and produced content.

JB How do you want people to remember your music?

AB As groundbreaking. That might seem like an extravagant or overindulgent notion, but I never had the dream of being mediocre or creating average content. I’d like to make art and music that relates to people on a profound level; something that will pluck tears or invoke emotion in the pit of someone’s stomach. The kind of thing that leaves someone thinking, perhaps differently than they had before about a given subject “I never thought of it that way before”. And of course, I’d like for my music to bring joy and for people’s eyes to light up as it resonates through speakers. I’m not asking for much right?

JB Who are your musical inspirations?

AB As I mentioned, anyone from the 80’s music scene will likely fall into this category. There are some contemporary artist though who are doing incredible things with music that I like to draw from. They include Sia, Ellie Goulding, Lady Gaga, Gotye, Ed Sheeran, Taylor Swift (I don’t care what people say, her producers are geniuses), Coldplay, Justin Bieber (Also underappreciated for his talent – he plays like five instruments if you didn’t know, and well!), The Weekend, and Ryan Adams. Though I don’t always pull from other musicians, I’ll get inspired by other artists around me – painters, designers, street artists, actors, slam poets; What they make, what I see, what I feel. I read all the time. Books, magazines, articles. I’m constantly aiming to fill up my mind like a sponge absorbing water, with all this information leading me to purge it somehow through my art, and the squeezing of the sponge will sometimes lead to things I can’t even explain.

AB6

amanda blush photo

JB What artist/producers would you like to work with?

AB There are so many talents in the world that it’s incredibly difficult to choose. Some producers I’d very much like to work with include Max Martin, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, David Foster, Pharrell Williams, and Mutt Lange. Artist include Paul Simon, Prince, John Mayer, Coldplay, Ed Sheeran, and Peter Gabriel.

JB What are you currently listening to in your car or headphones?

AB Amy Winehouse – “Love is a Losing Game”

JB What kind of themes interest you as a musician?

AB Themes…if by theme you mean genres, then everything. I have very eclectic tastes ranging from grassroots country to opera/classical to straight up gangster rap. I generally have no restrictions when it comes to my selection of music. I have a deep affection for anything 80’s, Michael, Prince, Madonna, Boy George, all of it. It’s a strong influence in my own writing style and produced content.

JB How do you want people to remember your music?

AB As groundbreaking. That might seem like an extravagant or overindulgent notion, but I never had the dream of being mediocre or creating average content. I’d like to make art and music that relates to people on a profound level; something that will pluck tears or invoke emotion in the pit of someone’s stomach. The kind of thing that leaves someone thinking, perhaps differently than they had before about a given subject “I never thought of it that way before”. And of course, I’d like for my music to bring joy and for people’s eyes to light up as it resonates through speakers. I’m not asking for much right?

JB Who are your musical inspirations?

AB As I mentioned, anyone from the 80’s music scene will likely fall into this category. There are some contemporary artist though who are doing incredible things with music that I like to draw from. They include Sia, Ellie Goulding, Lady Gaga, Gotye, Ed Sheeran, Taylor Swift (I don’t care what people say, her producers are geniuses), Coldplay, Justin Bieber (Also underappreciated for his talent – he plays like five instruments if you didn’t know, and well!), The Weekend, and Ryan Adams. Though I don’t always pull from other musicians, I’ll get inspired by other artists around me – painters, designers, street artists, actors, slam poets; What they make, what I see, what I feel. I read all the time. Books, magazines, articles. I’m constantly aiming to fill up my mind like a sponge absorbing water, with all this information leading me to purge it somehow through my art, and the squeezing of the sponge will sometimes lead to things I can’t even explain.

amanda blush photo

amanda blush photo

JB What is your opinion on music-streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music?

AB This is obviously a subject of some controversy. Though people love this, I unequivocally cannot support it. Artists such as myself work tirelessly and more than not fund our ambitious endeavors out of our own pockets. How is it fair that we go to work every day slaving to create just as anyone else goes to his or her job, and don’t get paid a fair price for our hours of service? Many musicians have spoken out against streaming sites, so the issue has undoubtedly been addressed but I feel rather pessimistic that anything will change in the near future as they are in such high demand.

JB Where is the line between insanity and creativity?

AB There isn’t one. Not for me anyway. My process is rather abstract and not understood by most. I’ve lost much to gain something for the sake of art. That might sound a little self professed, but what I go through when I’m in the creative process is no joke and sometimes even more difficult for the people who love me to witness. The same kind of focus and seriousness in which an actor prepares for a role is the same kind of dedication I devote when developing a record or visual piece. I sometimes feel I’ve become a character myself and in that way I think my music reaches a greater audience.

JB What do you feel is the biggest crisis or injustice the world is facing today?

AB With so much injustice, it’s difficult to choose just one. So I wont. I’ll choose the two I think are at least issues that drastically need to be paid attention.

1: Stricter laws on gun control and safety. The US has had more mass shootings and death or violence caused by an armed weapon than any other country in the world. I read a statistic recently that stated the amount of firearm deaths in the US since 1997 is 540,000 which is more than World War One and Two combined. We need to realize our proximity to this seemingly voiceless epidemic and stronger measures need to be implemented to protect the people and sadly now even the children.

2: Climate Change/ Global Warming (And the side effect mass consumerism is contributing to the disintegration of natural resources). It’s to the point now where someone mentions this and the response is an eye roll. This has to change immediately! Listen to Leo! Our planet is slowly decaying like necrotizing fasciitis and natural resources are depleting faster than they can be replenished. It is NOT sustainable to continue this way and the sooner we realize we are living in a wounded world, the sooner we can come together to try to heal it for next generations to come. If not, I really hope they find a sustainable way to live on Mars…

JB What is your opinion on music-streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music?

AB This is obviously a subject of some controversy. Though people love this, I unequivocally cannot support it. Artists such as myself work tirelessly and more than not fund our ambitious endeavors out of our own pockets. How is it fair that we go to work every day slaving to create just as anyone else goes to his or her job, and don’t get paid a fair price for our hours of service? Many musicians have spoken out against streaming sites, so the issue has undoubtedly been addressed but I feel rather pessimistic that anything will change in the near future as they are in such high demand.

JB Where is the line between insanity and creativity?

AB There isn’t one. Not for me anyway. My process is rather abstract and not understood by most. I’ve lost much to gain something for the sake of art. That might sound a little self professed, but what I go through when I’m in the creative process is no joke and sometimes even more difficult for the people who love me to witness. The same kind of focus and seriousness in which an actor prepares for a role is the same kind of dedication I devote when developing a record or visual piece. I sometimes feel I’ve become a character myself and in that way I think my music reaches a greater audience.

JB What do you feel is the biggest crisis or injustice the world is facing today?

AB With so much injustice, it’s difficult to choose just one. So I wont. I’ll choose the two I think are at least issues that drastically need to be paid attention.

1: Stricter laws on gun control and safety. The US has had more mass shootings and death or violence caused by an armed weapon than any other country in the world. I read a statistic recently that stated the amount of firearm deaths in the US since 1997 is 540,000 which is more than World War One and Two combined. We need to realize our proximity to this seemingly voiceless epidemic and stronger measures need to be implemented to protect the people and sadly now even the children.

2: Climate Change/ Global Warming (And the side effect mass consumerism is contributing to the disintegration of natural resources). It’s to the point now where someone mentions this and the response is an eye roll. This has to change immediately! Listen to Leo! Our planet is slowly decaying like necrotizing fasciitis and natural resources are depleting faster than they can be replenished. It is NOT sustainable to continue this way and the sooner we realize we are living in a wounded world, the sooner we can come together to try to heal it for next generations to come. If not, I really hope they find a sustainable way to live on Mars…

Discography Timeline

Gypsy Kingdom (2015)
amanda blush gypsy cover
Amulet (2010)
amanda blush amulet cover
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